Useless graphs (What went before)

Following on from the recent 10000th commit to the WordPress.org Subversion repository I thought I would take a quick look back at some statistics from the past a draw a few interesting graphs to look at how WordPress.org has grown over the past few years.  Enjoy!

WordPress release against repository revision number
WordPress release against repository revision number
Time against repository revision number
Time against repository revision number
WordPress release filesize in kilobytes
WordPress release filesize in kilobytes

19 thoughts on “Useless graphs (What went before)

  1. Now that clearly shows all the great work and dedication behind out beloved WordPress. Congrats and thanks. :)

    I’ve ran v2.7 on my testblog for quite a while now and I find it keeps getting better and better the more I use it. I’m pretty sure most users will be completely blown away by it… In a positive way. ;)

  2. Interesting thing to follow the statistics, between 1.5 and 2.6, WordPress almost quadrupled in size, but does anyone remember all the features and tweak introduced since?

    On the other hand, I always use the latest beta or RC of WordPress. Never had any problems with WP itself. Only with bad plugins.

  3. The filesize graph is very interesting. What happened from 2.5 to 2.5.1? I would have expected such a large step between major releases, say 2.3.x to 2.5, but not in a “minor” step like 2.5 to 2.5.1…
    Anyway, thanks for the great work :-)

  4. Thanks for the comments.

    The huge dip in revisions that happens on the first graph is because it is ordered by version number and releases where made to the Legacy 2.0.x branch after 2.1 and 2.2 had been released.

    @matt: It would be great to get the filesize down but I’m not sure the filesize is that big an issue.

    @Webrocker: The big filesize jump is 2.3 to 2.5 not 2.5 to 2.5.1

  5. I’ve never gotten why people had problems with filesizes going up. Was WordPress 2.3 somehow better than WordPress 2.5 just because it had a smaller download?

  6. Viper — I think people tend to see a (sometimes accurate) correlation between size of software and efficiency of software. Thus, smaller size ~= smaller load on server.

  7. The last graph is interesting: There are always large jumps between minor releases (2.0 → 2.1, etc.) but only very small jumps between bugfix releases (2.0.1 → 2.0.2, etc.).

    The amount is nearly constant between the releases mentioned above ;)

  8. Ozh: The first graph could probably be made linear by not using incremental version number in the X axis, but each versions release date. Indeed, 2.1 was released between WP 2.0.8 and 2.0.9 (remember that 2.0.x line, to be supported until 2010? – even though we’ve been waiting for 2.0.12’s security fixes for quite some time now), and therefore the bump is not a clear indicator of numer of revision changes

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